Can Massage Help Your Headache?

“This project is such a headache!”

They’re so common that the term has become synonymous with an annoyance, but what are headaches, really? And can massage therapy really help?

Different types, different causes.

We all know a headache when we feel it. It’s a pain in the head. However, not all headaches are created equal.

Tension headaches are the most common type of headache. Pain occurs on both sides of the head without other symptoms. The pain can range from very mild to severe.

Migraine headaches are often pulsing, and can be accompanied by nausea, dizziness, sensitivity to light and sound, and hallucinations. Some people experience migraines only rarely, while other people experience them on an almost daily basis.

Cluster headaches are less common. Generally experienced as severe pain around one eye, they occur in clusters over a period of time. Long periods of no symptoms may follow.

Secondary headaches are not conditions themselves, but are symptoms of other conditions. These conditions can be as everyday as a sinus infection. Or, they can be more serious, like traumatic brain injury or meningitis. Secondary headaches can be managed, however, it’s important to focus on getting the appropriate medical treatment for the underlying condition.

Headaches and massage

The Good News: 

Tension headaches, the type of headaches people are most likely to experience, seem to respond well to massage therapy. Massage helps reduce pain in the moment. Regular massage therapy appears to increase the time between headaches for those who experience them on a chronic basis. This could be a result of helping to manage stress. It could also be underlying mechanical issues that result in headaches. There’s no solid science yet on precisely why massage helps, only that it does.

More Good News: 

It’s no surprise that people who experience regular headaches are also more likely to experience high levels of stress. Not to mention, depression and anxiety. Studies have found that massage can help people who live with chronic headaches, as well as stress and anxiety.

Some people with secondary headaches can also benefit from massage. People with fibromyalgia related headaches experience both pain and stress relief with regular massage therapy. More gentle massage may be needed during a flare-up, but can provide relief for both headaches and body aches.

The Bad News: 

Massage therapy is wonderful and often helpful, but it’s not a cure for headaches. Some people just need a bit of rest or a drink of water (dehydration is a surprisingly common headache cause). Other people continue to experience headaches all their lives. Unfortunately, migraines triggered by things like foods or hormonal changes probably won’t see an impact from massage.

The Worse News: 

There are some times when getting a massage for headaches isn’t just unhelpful, it’s actually dangerous. Most often, this is related to secondary headaches.

There are some times when getting a massage for headaches isn’t just unhelpful, it’s actually dangerous. Most often, this is related to secondary headaches.

The aches caused by a fever may make you feel like massage would be wonderful. However, it’s not a good idea to overtax a body already working hard to fight an infection. Then, there is the risk of spreading the illness to your massage therapist and others. Headaches resulting from a recent head, neck, or back injury could also be made worse by a well-meaning massage therapist.

It’s important to seek the opinion of a physician when the pain may be the result of illness or injury. Start by receiving appropriate care for the issue causing the headache. Along the way, you can ask them whether or not massage is a good idea. Safe is always better than sorry

Headaches can be a real, well… headache. But there’s help.

A change of environment may help. If you have a headache and have been hunched over a computer for hours, try a stretch. A quick walk outside or a brief nap can help with a headache caused by eye strain. If you haven’t eaten or drunk anything all day, do that. It’s not uncommon to get busy and distracted and forget basic self-care.

If it’s safe to take them, medications like ibuprofen or aspirin can be helpful in treating a headache. Sometimes caffeine helps. Strong or chronic headaches may require prescription medication.

And then there’s massage therapy, of course. It’s not a magical cure-all, but for many people, it really does help manage the pain and stress of headaches. Are you one of them? Schedule your next massage, and let’s find out together.

Can You Avoid a Wrinkle in Time?

You probably have a rough idea of where wrinkles come from… laugh lines, frown lines, decreased skin elasticity as we age… but you may not consider one of the key contributing elements—the muscles underneath.

Wrinkles tend to develop where muscles pull on the skin, and muscle tension in our face, from stress, tension, even laughing and smiling a lot, can create the holding patterns that lead to wrinkles. Factor in the loss of elasticity over time and voila! Wrinkles!

Facial massage helps soften tight muscles in the face, which in turn may help reduce the appearance of wrinkles. In addition, massage improves circulation to your skin, which you know is good for you! Other benefits of facial massage include easing headaches and sinus pain.

I tend to include facial massage in most sessions, but let me know if you want me to be sure to include it in yours! Just contact me to schedule, or book your appointment online!

Be Well, 
Tricia

Like Birch Trees, We Grow

leaf-3341386_1920As I have continued the forward momentum of Birch Tree Wellness, I have been learning about the kinds of things my clients are looking for out of massage. The thing I see the most is chronic pain of one sort or another.

For many people it’s stress related. It may be unforgiving jobs, family or life stress. Sometimes the chronic pain comes from physical activity or the lack thereof, as in demanding desk jobs. Other times, it’s chronic pain associated with mental or emotional distress.

What Does All That Mean?

All of this has led me to become interested in specializing in chronic pain. Going forward, I’ll be looking into continuing education related to chronic pain, new muscle release techniques, and the effects of psychology on the human body. Some of the modalities I’ll be adding in the future include Spontaneous Muscle Release Therapy (SMRT)  a positional release modality that interrupts pain signals in the body quickly and painlessly, and CranioSacral Therapy (CST) – a form of bodywork using gentle touch release restrictions in the soft tissues that surround the central nervous system.
Here is some information about the programs I’m looking at, if you would like to learn more:

What’s Next?

IMG_8960In the process of brainstorming all of these ideas, one of the things I’ve done is streamlined the scheduling process. In my opinion, all massage is “therapeutic” whether you just need to relax, or you really need some deep tissue work and stretching. So, now when you schedule, whether it’s online or in person, you won’t have so many types of appointments to choose from. In the scheduling system, you just choose “Therapeutic Massage” and how long you want the massage to be, and we’ll chat about what exactly you’re looking for. No more decision fatigue!

What About the Goodies?

The extras are still there! You can schedule a hot stone massage, add on a mini hot stone massage, aromatherapy, or a foot scrub. In addition, you can still schedule specialized appointments like Pregnancy Massage, Intuitive Bodywork, Relaxation Training, or Massage & Reiki together. The Monday Special and Ultimate Study Break are also still available at this time.

In a Nutshell

plant-3117533_1920For everyone who has been coming to Birch Tree Wellness over the last couple of years, essentially the only thing that has really changed is the name of the appointment you’re scheduling. We’ll continue with the same awesome massage therapy you’ve been getting, and as I learn new tricks, we’ll apply them where appropriate! If you have chronic pain, we’ll continue working on your chronic pain. If you are experiencing emotional or mental distress – with or without chronic pain – we’ll continue working with whatever combination of massage, Reiki, and other modalities are helping you.

Your Feedback is Welcome!

If you learn about a type of massage or other bodywork or healing modality you think I’d be interested in, feel free to send along the information! If you have more questions about any of the changes, don’t hesitate to ask them. As always, my massage practice is about all of you, my awesome clients, and what kind of wellness magic we can work together!
Be Well,
Tricia

5 Ways to Keep That Post-Massage Zen

You finally took the time to schedule yourself a massage. Now, you’re feeling all mellow, and your aches and pains have eased. Maybe you’re kind of dreading heading out into the “real world” again. What can you do to keep that post-massage zen going just a little bit longer?


1. Pick the Right Time

If possible, try to schedule your massage on a day when you can take it easy afterwards. At least give yourself an hour or so to enjoy the zen. Heading right back to work or running home to do house or yard work is definitely a good way to let that tension seep right back into your muscles. Just as you allowed yourself the opportunity for relaxation, you owe yourself the chance to enjoy that relaxation for a little while afterwards.

2. Set the Scene – Before and After

Get yourself in the zone before the massage even starts. Tone down your music, avoid stressful phone calls, maybe drink a little herbal tea. Arrive a little early, so that you don’t feel rushed. Make sure before you shut off your car you either turn off your radio, turn it down, or set it to something that relaxes you. Take a little time to make sure you’re fully back in your head before getting on the road!

3. Take a Hot Bath

Stretch out the relaxed feeling even longer with a nice soak in the tub or hot tub, or warming shower. Use a favorite essential oil in the tub or a natural soap in the shower. Epsom salts are a great additive to continue easing tight muscles, especially if you’ve had a lot of deep tissue work during your appointment.

4. Meditate

If you have the time, take a few minutes to yourself. Take your mind back to the twilight state. that sort of not asleep, not awake sensation you may experience during a massage. This is a great starting point for some reflective or centering and grounding meditation.

5. Take  Yourself on a Date

Plan a trip to your favorite bookstore, or take a book to a cozy cafe and read with a cup of tea. Go to a museum or for a quiet walk in nature. Just pick a favorite short (or long) activity that makes you happy or soothes your soul!

Essentially, just about anything that makes you happy, relaxes you, and keeps those positive hormones flowing. That means if going home to energetic children or cooking dinner for your family is what makes you happy, go for it! You might discover it’s pretty easy to find ways to stretch out the positive vibes from your massage appointment!

Be Well,
Tricia

New Year, New You?

 
weight-loss-2036969_640Is there any time of year more obsessed with health habits than the New Year? Even spring bikini season panic doesn’t reach this level of hype. Everywhere you go, someone is trying to get you to try a class, a supplement, a shake, a piece of equipment, a diet, a lifestyle… and it can be exhausting trying to figure out what’s real and what’s a load of hooey. It’s perfectly normal to look forward to a fresh start in January (or not!), but here’s a little guidance on whether to put money down on that hot new habit after the holidays.

Does it promise quick fixes?

If whatever you’re thinking of trying *SWEARS* you’ll get the desired result in no time at all—you can be pretty sure you’re entering into scam territory. The human body is based on homeostasis. It can change, and it does, but most of those changes occur over time. There’s a reason why most things that cause fast changes in the body (like surgery and drugs) require a physician to administer them; they can be dangerous if not used carefully. If you’ve been out of shape for five years, don’t expect to get back in shape in five weeks. That’s just not how the body works.

potion-1249050_1280Does it promise a panacea?

There are diets that can help you lose weight. There are exercise routines that can help you gain muscle and strength. There are massages that can help you relax and manage your stress levels. (Might want to get on that one soon!) But if someone is selling One Amazing Thing that will evaporate your fat, increase your happiness, straighten your posture, whiten your teeth, cure your cancer, and send your sex drive through the roof? You can be pretty sure it’s not worth your money. Don’t pay a Magical Thinking Tax for exaggerated claims.

Does it rely on conspiracy theories for marketing?

Conspiracies can be fun to read about, but if the main selling point is that “doctors hate it” or “Big Pharma doesn’t want you to know about this,” it’s probably not the best addition to your life. Why? Because you and your physician (and your dentist, your massage therapist, your counselor, your personal trainer, your nutritionist…) are part of your health and wellness team. If any one of them refuses to be a team player, they’re not doing what’s best for you.
When the Magic Cure’s only big selling point is how much someone else hates it… definitely not cool. If you haven’t heard much else about said Magic Cure, it’s probably not because your health team is trying desperately to hide it from you. It’s much more likely that it just doesn’t work at all. I recommend researching it further, or asking those members of your wellness team what their thoughts on it REALLY are.

woman-591576_640Does it fit your life, your budget, your goals, and your understanding of reality?

If yes, then this is something worth looking into, whether it’s a gym membership, a cookbook of heart-healthy meals, or a habit tracking app. Ultimately, we try things out and see how they work for us over the long haul. Not everything will be a perfect fit, but at least we can weed out some of the resolutionist marketing malarkey and move forward with our best efforts into the new year.

5 Ways Massage Can Improve Your Health

5 ways massage can improve your health

Wondering how massage can improve your health? The American Massage Therapy Association publishes lots of research on the benefits of massage. Check out this collection of links to different research information!


1. Reduce stress – Stress can take emotional and physical tolls. Massage therapy may relieve stress. In addition, it can help related issues such as tension headaches.

2. Get better sleep – Research indicates that massage can improve health by improving your sleep. This is especially helpful in people with chronic pain, anxiety, and stress.

3. Boost mental health and wellness – Research suggests that along with symptoms of stress, anxiety and depression may be directly affected with massage therapy.

4. Manage pain – Pain can affect your quality of life, not to mention, impede recovery from illness or injury. Research shows massage can help low-back pain, headaches, neck pain, and more.

5. Increase range of motion – Elite and recreational athletes alike can benefit from massage therapy. Massage can help reduce muscle tension, improve exercise performance and prevent injuries.

Here are some more posts that answer frequently asked questions:

Source: AMTAmassage.org

Should I Cancel My Massage If I’m Sick?

massage germs

I have a Cold/the Flu, Should I Cancel My Appointment?

Short answer: Yes, please.
Long Answer: Yes, please.

Massage is great, I’m not going to argue with you there. But it’s not always a great idea. As cold and flu season hits, it’s important that you know when it may be necessary to cancel your appointment.

Why Should I Cancel?

When you are sick, your body needs rest.

It’s strange to think about it this way, but receiving massage is an active task, it is not entirely rest. Massage causes change in the body, and your body has to work to maintain stability. Getting a massage when you are sick takes attention away from infection-fighting. That’s no good.

You’re not going to be cozy on the massage table.

Sure, it sounds like a warm squishy massage table would be fantastic. But the moment you put your already-stuffy head into that face cradle, you’ll realize the error of your ways. Gravity and pressure are not your friend here. Even if I do a great face massage to drain your sinuses, you’ll likely feel worse when you get off the table.

You could get me sick.

Since most of the common winter viruses are contagious even before symptoms show up, I could pass the cooties along to more clients before I even know it’s happening. Further, when I get sick, I have to cancel clients and take a few days off work. I work for myself, with no paid sick days to compensate for lost wages.

Sure, as a growing small business, I am building a fund for these situations. However, I would much rather use that fund for a vacation or a fancy new massage table. So, I’m gonna try to stay germ-free.

So it’s a deal. You’ll cancel so as not to infect me and my massage room, and I’ll do the same for you. We’ll keep each other safe.

When Should I Cancel?

should I cancel my massage if I'm sick?
  • If you have nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea in the past 24 hours, or are still feeling icky from a recent bout of such things.
  • If you’ve had a fever in the past 24 hours, or fever-related symptoms. This includes chills, aches, and fatigue. Even if you’re keeping the fever down with medicine, you’re still sick. The fever counts.
  • If you are itchy, runny, and/or sneezy, and you’re not 100% certain it’s seasonal allergies. And even then, allergies may leave you so miserable that the hour on my table would be wasted time and money for you.
  • If you are coughing constantly, or just a lot.
  • If someone in your household is ill and you are feeling at all funky, please cancel.

There is often some gray area here, especially if you are in the recovery phase of a virus or bacterial infection.  If you’re unsure about your situation, please call me before your appointment and we can make a decision together. For more information about the life cycle of a cold, check out this article.

Also, if you’re sick don’t worry about a cancellation fee, I won’t charge you for helping keep germs at bay!

Be Well, Stay Well!
Tricia

How Long of a Massage Appointment Should I Schedule?

massage appointment menu

If you have never scheduled a massage appointment before, looking at a full menu of options might be intimidating. Or, maybe you’ve just always had “a massage” and didn’t really consider the benefits beyond relaxation. Here are some descriptions of the types of massage I offer and how long a session you might schedule:

Chair Massage

chair massage appointment

You may have seen this type of massage at any assortment of locations, from offices to sports events. A specially designed chair allows you to sit relaxed and fully clothed, leaning forward into a cushioned face cradle.

From that position, the massage therapist can work on your back, shoulders, arms, hands, neck and head. Sometimes, it’s possible to turn and face the other way in the chair for work on legs and feet.

How Long Should I Schedule?

At this time, I primarily offer chair massage at events. In those cases, most chair massages average around 5 to 10 minutes. Even just a few minutes can be helpful in improving circulation, loosening stiff muscles, and relieving pain.

  • 5 Minutes: Great for a quick pick-me-up. Helps relieve work related shoulder and neck tension. We can focus on one problem area, like sore shoulders. Also helpful for an achy upper back, or even just forearms and hands.
  • 10 Minutes: You may be surprised at how much better a 10 minute massage can make you feel! Great for working on shoulders, neck and upper back, or the entire back down into the low back area.
  • 15-20 Minutes: This length is for doing some deeper work on shoulders and the entire back. However, for significant issues, I do prefer to use a massage table.
  • 20+ Minutes: At this length, I prefer working on the table. I have better access to your neck & shoulders. Plus laying on the table is more relaxing.

Relaxation Massage Appointment

benefits of massage, Swedish massage, relaxation massage

For a relaxation massage, I use the long, flowing, and soothing strokes of Swedish massage. I adjust the pressure of the strokes to your comfort. When you just want to relax and let go, this is the massage for you.

We don’t focus on a specific problem area, nor poke and prod at “knots” or tight spots. At most, I may adjust the timing of the massage to spend more time on tired feet or achy shoulders. But, nothing too intense. This massage is just about relaxing, reducing stress, and improving your outlook on life.

How Long Should I Schedule?

  • 30 Minutes: It is possible to leave a 30 minute massage feeling relaxed and refreshed. However, given the shorter appointment length, I recommend focusing the massage on the upper body. That way, we aren’t just speeding through your massage to get to all the parts.
  • 60 Minutes: This is an average length relaxation massage. We have time to get the full body from head to toes. Plus, you can really sink in to the relaxation.
  • 90-120 Minutes: A long massage session allows for deep relaxation and restorative rest. One hour of massage has similar benefits as three hours of restorative rest. So, with a longer massage, you’re getting the benefits of a nice, long nap. In addition, I have time to really slow down those slow, soothing Swedish massage strokes. This allows you the full benefit of their positive effects on your nervous system.

Therapeutic Massage Appointment

therapeutic massage
deep tissue massage
massage appointment

With this type of massage, while we’re not completely ignoring relaxation, we’re focused on it less. There’s a bit more time spent on tight muscles and sore spots. We may talk a bit more about what I’m finding. I might include stretches for your arms or legs, or ask you to move a body part against resistance. This massage is about improving your mobility, releasing tension and relieving pain.

How Long Should I Schedule?

  • 30 Minutes: Ideally, we’re just working on one specific area for 30 minutes.
  • 60 Minutes: In an hour, we can get most of a full body massage. However, I do like to take doing some stretching, range of motion and deep tissue work on problem areas. If this is the case, we should consider focusing the therapeutic work to a particular problem area.
  • 90-120 Minutes: In 90 minutes, we can get in full body massage and have time for stretching, etc. Two hours is perfect for doing some nice, slow, detailed work on all problem areas. This includes hip and arm stretches, deep work on particular problem muscles, and some finishing soothing Swedish massage to relax and relieve pain.

What if I’m Still Confused?

If you’re still not sure, you can always contact me to talk about what’s going on. We can plan a long first session with shorter follow ups, or a series of short sessions. I’m pretty flexible when it comes to working with you, your schedule, and your budget. Together, we’ll get you sorted out.

What is Reiki?

ReikiReiki has been steadily growing in public awareness in recent years. Chances are, you’ve at least heard the term, or seen it and wondered how to pronounce it (Ray-Key). In a nutshell, Reiki is a simple, safe method of natural healing and self-care that anyone can learn to use.

Where Did Reiki Come From?

While some form Reiki or energy healing itself has been practiced for centuries, this particular method of “laying on hands” for stress reduction, relaxation, and promoting healing was discovered by Mikao Usui after a spiritual experience on Mt. Kurama in Japan in 1922. He first practiced this healing method on family and friends, eventually developing into a system that became known as “Usui Reiki Healing Method”. A decade later, Reiki made its way to the West via Hawaii with the help of Mrs. Hawayo Takata.

What Does Reiki Mean?

reiki kanjiThe name Reiki comes from two Japanese Kanji, Rei and Ki. Rei is generally defined as meaning “universal” and representing body, mind and spirit. Ki is life energy, and you’ll find similar concepts throughout the world, such as chi, prana, qi, or ti. It is the non-physical energy that animates all living things. Therefore, Reiki can be generally translated to “universal life force”.

How Does Reiki Work?

Individuals who use Reiki are channeling, or provides a conduit for, this universal life force. Unlike most types of energy healing, Reiki is considered to be an energy that can only be channeled by someone who has been attuned to it. In the simplest sense, an attunement means that adjustments are made on a spiritual consciousness (Rei) level that enable the student to channel Reiki. Once you have received an attunement, it’s as simple as placing your hands on yourself or others with the intention of healing.
Life energy (Ki) flows through the body in energy pathways, through organs, and around us in an energy field (aura). When this energy flow is slowed or blocked, it can cause a decreased functioning in the organs or systems of the body and lead to illness. During a Reiki session, the universal consciousness (Rei) assesses where the energy flow is slowed or blocked, and the energy is directed to where it is needed, breaking up blockages, clearing the energy pathways, and allowing Ki to flow naturally.

How is Reiki Used?

wellness-285590_640Reiki is a powerful, yet gentle healing method. Because its source is that of spiritual or universal consciousness, it is believed that this spiritual consciousness always knows what a person needs and will adjust the healing for each individual person. As a result, it can be complementary to other forms of treatment, including medical and psychological care.
Reiki is offered to patients in hospitals across the country as part of hospital or clinic sponsored programs, or as part of hospice care. This includes the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where it is offered to both inpatient and outpatient oncology patients as part of their whole patient integrative care process. Locally, our own Eastern Maine Medical Center has a volunteer Reiki program that is available to patients in all of their inpatient departments and the outpatient Cancer Care of Maine location.
Studies have shown that Reiki can decrease recovery time from surgery, improve patient attitude, and reduce unwanted medication side effects. A research study in 2000 at Hartford Hospital in Connecticut indicated that Reiki improved sleep, reduced pain, and reduced nausea, as well as reducing anxiety during pregnancy. It has been used to aid in healing everything from colds to cancer.

Who Can Learn Reiki?

meditation-1384758_640Anyone can learn Reiki. You don’t need any particular education level or spiritual belief system to use it. It doesn’t even take years of practice to be able to use it successfully. Once a student receives the attunement, they have Reiki and can use it.
Many massage therapists are introduced to Reiki as part of their massage licensing training, and elect to continue providing Reiki as part of their massage practice. Nurses, healthcare aides, and hospice care volunteers often learn Reiki to help their patients during the course of their regular care. Everyday people can learn to use it to benefit aging parents, family members suffering from illness, or just as part of their regular self-care routine.

Want to Learn More?

I’m offering a special for the month of July! “Try Reiki” – You can try a half an hour Reiki healing session for $20. Just contact me to schedule your appointment or book online at MassageBook and choose “Try Reiki”.
If you would like to learn even more and receive your Reiki attunement, stay tuned for Reiki I and II classes coming soon. You can receive information about when Reiki classes will be held by following Birch Tree Wellness on Facebook or signing up for the monthly newsletter. If you would just like to ask some questions about Reiki, you’re always welcome to contact me.

Reiki Resources:

Just for today, I will not be angry.

Just for today, I will not worry.

Just for today, I will be grateful.

Just for today, I will do my work honestly.

Just for today, I will be kind to every living thing.

Introducing Intuitive Bodywork

Intuitive BodyworkWhat is Intuitive Bodywork?

Sometimes maybe you feel a little bit off, and you’re not quite sure if massage is what you need, or Reiki, or something completely different. During an Intuitive Bodywork session, I will combine elements of massage, stretches, aromatherapy, Reiki, and other energy work, depending upon what it feels like you need intuitively.

How Does It Work?

At the beginning of your appointment, we’ll talk a little bit about what trouble you’re having. It can be mind, body, or spirit. Then you’ll hop on the massage table, undressed to your level of comfort, and covered with a sheet and/or blanket. During your session, I’ll start with Reiki at your head and move down your body, using my intuition to determine if you need some energy in a particular area, or maybe your neck needs to stretch, or you need some massage work on your shoulders and back, or foot reflexology. Once the session is finished, I’ll leave the room and give you a few minutes to collect yourself and get off the table. Before you leave, we can talk a bit about what I did, what things I might have picked up intuitively, and how you’re feeling.

What’s Intuitive About It?

I define intuition as that “knowing” or “gut feeling” when you perceive or know something without necessarily having a rational reason for it. Examples might be when your phone rings and you know who is calling without looking at caller ID; or you might have the urge to call someone and you find out they are having a bad day. Intuition can be practiced and developed, used to help guide yourself and others in day to day life.
I’ve spent many years helping people on an intuitive level, with energy work and spiritual guidance, as well as helping people learn to recognize and use their intuition. I feel that mixing intuition in with benefits of massage, reiki and bodywork is a natural progression into helping people heal themselves on a body, mind, and spirit level. If you would like to give Intuitive Bodywork a try, just contact me or schedule an appointment online today!
~Tricia